Fab functional foods

Functional foods do more than provide nutritional value. They contain naturally-occurring chemicals that are thought to do something special (when consumed as part of a balanced diet). Unlike the mythical superfoods, there are reams of scientific evidence to support the claims being made about functional foods. Nonetheless, you need to know that most of the …

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Are Superfoods a myth?

Blueberries, kale, sweet potatoes, beans, nuts, avocado, salmon, beetroot, South American acai berries, Japanese matcha powder, wheat grass shots, turmeric, camu camu powder, chia seeds, coconut oil, goji berries, dragon fruit, jackfruit, seaweed, freekeh, sacha inchi, Icelandic Skyr yoghurt, bee pollen, hemp seeds, flax seeds... the list goes on and on! Anything weird, wild or …

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Why are foods fortified?

Many processed foods (such as breads and breakfast cereals) are 'enriched' with added nutritional elements such as folate, calcium, iodine, fibre, vitamins ACDE, or protein. Foods can be fortified for a variety of reasons; some are Public Health directives from the government, while others are marketing initiatives to attract buyers. (Photo by hermaion on Pexels.com) …

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Coffee or tea?

Tea and coffee are popular for their caffeine hit as a morning pick-me-up and for many other reasons. One cup of tea contains about 40mg of caffeine, whereas a cup of coffee can have a whopping 60-100mg per cup, or even higher! Coffee’s caffeine content depends on the bean variety, how it’s roasted (lighter roasts …

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Chai tea: What’s in a name?

Across Asia, chai simply means ‘tea’. But in Western countries chai describes a black tea flavoured with a combination of aromatic spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, black pepper and vanilla. In villages of the Indian sub-continent, this fragrant concoction is a rich milky-sweet infusion made by boiling full-cream milk with black tea leaves …

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Shining a light on black tea

Scientists agree that tea-drinking can have positive health effects, but the 'mechanism of action' remains a mystery. Why is tea so good for us? Laboratory studies suggest a possible protective role against cardiovascular diseases (CVD) due to a reduction in platelet aggregation (blood thinning/anti-clotting) and a lowering of cholesterol. We don't know if the same …

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